Singing in reverse

Teaching is a funny game. In truth, it’s a bit like gardening; the secret is in the preparation. Good soil, the right fertilisers, and a consideration of the plants allow a gardener to have an entire garden that thrives. If you were to ignore these things and plant anywhere on unimproved soil, you get substandard results.

Teaching is a funny game. In truth, it’s a bit like gardening; the secret is in the preparation. Good soil, the right fertilisers, and a consideration of the plants allow a gardener to have an entire garden that thrives. If you were to ignore these things and plant anywhere on unimproved soil, you get substandard results.

My friend Shane taught me that in gardening, soil preparation is the first key of gardening. Plant placement is second, and regular care is the third. A classroom is similar. Too many teachers spend too little time on preparation, and then spend enormous amounts of time on placement (and replacement) and care of the classroom.

A well planned lesson should almost run itself. Engaged students persist in an activity because they care about the overarching ideas and know that they are working towards a meaningful goal. They know that the assessment will actually test them and that their learning will be held accountable.

So we start with the goal in mind. We then create assessment that tests these learning goals, and from that we plan our lessons. It sounds easy but so does being a pilot when you describe it as “Take off, fly in the right direction, and then land your plane”.

I’m hoping that my school’s English curriculum develops some more rigour and also some more innovative approaches towards teaching literacy and literature as we go through this process of planning.  I remain hopeful!

Joseph

Author: Joseph

Writer, educator, and bon vivant.